Entries by Shawn McAllister

Solace Pivotal Cloud Foundry Tile is now GA!

This is an exciting time for us, our friends at Pivotal and our user community as we take our next step on improving accessibility to Solace Open Data Movement technology. Today our Solace Messaging for PCF Tile is generally available as part of the Pivotal Network. The tile, which allows app developers to use Solace messaging in any Pivotal Cloud Foundry deployment, has been in Beta for several months. This release is ready for prime time, with enough features and fixes to support your favorite microservice or IoT use case.

The highlights of this release include:

  • High Availability: VMR HA is now provisioned for you in key plans to add robustness for your applications with the click of a button
  • More Plan Choices: We now have 5 distinct plans for developers to choose from depending on your needs – some on a shared VMR for development, some on your own dedicated VMR, with choices of performance/capacity and high availability.

Read the rest

Enabling Open Data Movement in a Hybrid Cloud Environment

Everybody wants to take advantage of the cloud to save money, make their infrastructure more instantly scalable and make app teams more productive. To realize those benefits you need to be able share data between legacy applications deployed on-premise and new apps in the cloud. Many people expect this to be easy, and are surprised to learn that this application connectivity can become quite complex and difficult to achieve if you don’t start with a holistic strategy.

So how do you achieve hybrid and multi cloud application connectivity in a simple, robust and secure manner without losing the functionality your applications need? In this article I’ll explore a few options.

The Situation You Face

In order to create a single data movement fabric that allows you to deploy applications in any cloud, you need to cover three types of connectivity:

  1. Messaging within each cloud – between distributed applications or microservices in each target cloud
  2. Hybrid Cloud data movement – between your existing on-premise apps and your new cloud apps
  3. Cloud-to-cloud data movement – so applications running in different clouds can share information

Cloud Messaging

Most enterprises have in place some form of on-premise message bus like IBM MQ or JMS, which can be based on open source or provided by a vendor.… Read the rest

Talking Cloud Data Movement with Pivotal

Yesterday I joined the Pivotal Insights podcast to discuss with Jeff Kelly and Dormain Drewitz the challenges developers face when building data pipelines and message queues in Cloud-native environments. During the episode, called Taming Data Movement Complexity, I talked about some specific IoT cases and explained how to get enterprise data moving with Solace in Pivotal Cloud Foundry.

I hope you’ll give it a listen to hear my thoughts on how Solace makes it easier to get messages moving in PCF.

Other Resources

Read the rest

Extending Standards Support by Embracing AMQP 1.0

Since we founded our company with the goal of disrupting the enterprise messaging market, the application landscape has shifted dramatically. Back then, there was no cloud and the market for messaging was dominated by two commercial, closed, proprietary products: IBM MQ Series (now IBM WebSphere MQ) and TIBCO Rendezvous.

But in the last decade or so, the increasing popularity of open and de facto standard messaging APIs and protocols have brought enterprises and developers relief from those days of vendor lock-in. Namely, JMS for general Java-based messaging workloads, RESTful applications for point-to-point, MQTT for IoT, and WebSockets for streaming to browsers and mobile devices.

All that progress has allowed many more use cases to be addressed in an open way without the risk of vendor lock-in, and Solace has been championing these technologies and techniques. We’ve supported JMS for years, and more recently added REST capabilities and support for MQTT and Paho APIs to our platform.… Read the rest

A Message for All Messaging Developers

dev-portal-off-kilterI’m very happy to announce that we have launched a new developer portal with a wealth of resources that will help architects and developers be even more successful building applications with Solace technology. That’s the headline “what” news, but let me back up and explain the “why.”

The launch of our Virtual Message Router (VMR) software product earlier this summer made it much easier for individual developers to get their hands on Solace message brokers. Even though it was an early release, we could immediately tell this new software was going to be in very high demand, both as a standalone product and as a way of simplifying the development of applications slated for deployment onto our hardware.

We knew that to support this demand we’d need to give people self-service access to not just the software itself, but to documentation, tools and tutorials that would help them be successful with it, so we accelerated our plans to build our full-featured developer portal.… Read the rest

Is Big Data Recreating the Messaging Proliferation Problem?

The previous blog post in this series explained how many capital markets firms have ended up with a multitude of messaging technologies to handle different data movement requirements, the problems associated with that, and how Solace technology helps simplify such environments. This post drills in to how big data is leading companies in other industries down this same path.

According to Gartner, as of June 2014, 73 percent of organizations have or will be investing in big data in the next two years. While big data is intended to support both structured and unstructured data, many organizations start by analyzing their structured transactional data because it’s easier for them to understand, and can be more readily applied to optimizing operational efficiency.

During this phase, enterprises focus on how the big data technology will extract value from their data. They load all kinds of information into their big data lake using whatever tools are at hand or easiest to add to the mix.… Read the rest

Could the “Messaging Proliferation” Problem Happen to You?

If you work in capital markets, you know that most buy side and sell side firms operate lots of different messaging products across their business. It’s not unusual for a firm to have six to ten different messaging technologies in their production environment, from different vendors, as a legacy of M&A and developed internally. As a rational technologist, I can hear your internal line of questioning: How does this happen? What drives this type of fragmentation? Is it as bad as it sounds? And you’re probably thinking this could never happen to you.

But if you’re implementing big data or cloud, it probably already is. I will explain why, but first – how did capital markets get to this point and what are they doing about it?

Not so long ago, financial trading was done by customers talking to their brokers who talked to traders who placed an order to make a trade.… Read the rest

How can I integrate Solace with my IBM Environment?

Businessman writing complex organisation structure on screenIn addition to supporting high performance applications like trading platforms, online gaming systems and real-time big data environments, many of our customers use our message routers to make enterprise messaging available “as a service” to scores of applications throughout their business. Doing so helps them reduce the cost and complexity of their infrastructure while making it more robust and easier to manage. More of these clients have been asking one particular question lately: “I like this messaging as a service platform, but what about my existing IBM infrastructure – how can you help me with that?” Good question!

I’ve also been engaged with several clients who want to upgrade their messaging fabric as part of moving their ESB to open source products like Mule ESB and JBOSS Fuse, or add Big Data analytics to their architecture. These clients had similar questions as to how to integrate their existing IBM WebSphere infrastructure with these new systems.… Read the rest

Introducing Solace 3500 Series and SolOS 7.0 — Many Big Steps Forward

3500-series-blog-post-featured-picToday is an exciting day for us at Solace, and for our customers. This morning we announced a huge step in the evolution of our products with so many improvements – most of which would be big news on their own – that I don’t know where to start. There’s something big for everybody in this release, from architects to developers to your CIO!

It was tough, but I picked my four favorite features to talk about today:

  • Less is more. First off is our new 3500 series message routers, the Solace 3560 and Solace 3530, next-generation versions of our Solace 3260 and Solace 3230, respectively. The Solace 3560 provides the same performance as our old top-of-the-line 3260 chassis in half the space (2 rack units vs. 4), effectively doubling throughput per rack unit. For customers who have lots of message routers and those who use them in colocation centers, this shrinkage is very welcome.

Read the rest

Investment Banking and the Middle Office Shock Absorber

Shock motorcycleEquities trading is the poster child for applications that demand the distribution of lots of data with extremely high performance – latency in the low microseconds, reaching for nanoseconds, and with as little “jitter” as possible even through unpredictable bursts of trading activity. But when it’s time to send order and trade data to the middle office systems responsible for non-real-time functions such as risk management, OATS reporting, etc., the prime directive shifts from speed to certainty. Every single message must be delivered to lots of recipients, many of them slow consumers, without putting “back pressure” on high-speed front office trading applications. This is why equities trading and OMS systems need a shock absorber.

Ever since algorithmic/electronic trading revolutionized capital markets, the “need for speed” has driven the development of networking technologies like cut-through Ethernet switches and 10 GE NICs that support kernel bypass, and encouraged techniques like running multiple apps on multicore servers with overclocked cores.… Read the rest