Entries by Jonathan Schabowsky

New Solace PCF Tile, What’s the Big Deal?!

Solace recently released a new version of the Solace Messaging Tile for Pivotal Cloud Foundry (PCF). The Enterprise Edition of the tile supports fault tolerance and high availability, and it includes some game-changing features like TCP Routes and support for AMQP 1.0 that I wanted to share my excitement about.

TCP Routes: Integrating the Real World with PCF

PCF, and more generally all platforms as a service, have changed the way we view the development, deployment and scalability of applications. The ability to deploy applications on-prem or in any cloud provides the flexibility and freedom to meet today’s business needs, while on-demand implementation saves organizations money with “right size” scaling.  PCF is not an island, as applications running in the cloud must be fed data to provide business value. What if sensor data could be streamed into PCF? What if you could connect your legacy systems to new microservices running in PCF?… Read the rest

Achieving Microservices Flexibility… Through Patterns!

Whether organizations turn to microservices to solve issues with existing applications or build greenfield applications, creating applications that consist of many single purpose microservices introduces the need for those individual services to interact in real-time to provide value to the end user.

Today REST is most commonly used for these interactions, and it works fine for some situations, but as discussed in my previous blog post there are many advantages to using messaging instead, not the least of which is the ability to use a wide range of synchronous and asynchronous message exchange patterns. These patterns, such as publish/subscribe, request/reply, one-way notification and multi-request/single-response have been a staple of enterprise architecture for many years, and they are ideal for microservices since they are inherently distributed. To prove this point, lets look at how you might solve a real-world problem.

Meet Sol-Beer

The problem I have chosen to solve is near and dear to my heart (as I hope it is to yours!).… Read the rest

NMS API + AMQP: The Benefits of Open Source and Open Wireline Protocols

In 2001, the first Java Message Service (JMS) specification revolutionized the message oriented middleware space by offering a standard API for the sending and receiving of messages, thus freeing application developers and architects from being locked into vendor specific APIs. More recently,  the Apache community created the .NET Message Service API (NMS) which offers a vendor agnostic .NET interface to a variety of messaging systems. The NMS API gives the flexibility to write .NET applications in C#, VB or any other .NET language, all while using a single API to connect to any number of messaging providers.

While these API’s have helped to reduce the code changes required when switching messaging implementations, they’re only a first step to achieving independence and freedom from all lock-in. Because NMS simply provides a set of .NET interfaces, it is up to each vendor or open source project’s community to match the interface to their wireline protocol (which is frequently non-standard) and the message broker it connects to.… Read the rest

Experience the Awesomeness of Event-Driven Microservices

Microservices are extremely popular these days, and for good reason. They provide a blueprint that makes it easier for developers to repeatedly create robust and scalable applications. While there is no official industry-adopted definition of microservices, there are some generally accepted attributes that make up a microservice:

  • Small and single in purpose
  • Communicate via technology agnostic protocols
  • Support continuous integration
  • Independently deployable.

Many of these attributes are interrelated – since services are to be small and single in purpose, they must communicate with each other to provide real business value, and to be independently deployable they need to be small and single in purpose. While each of these are vital attributes, the ability to communicate without being tightly coupled to one another is a critical aspect of microservices architecture.

Smart Endpoints and Dumb Pipes

Well-known author and developer Martin Fowler advocates what he calls “smart endpoints and dumb pipes” for microservices communication.… Read the rest