Entries by Steve Buchko

New Version of Solace VMR Adds AMQP, Boosts Performance, Eases Installation into Public Cloud

Solace has just released version 8.6.0 of the Solace Virtual Message Router. With this release, we’ve added support for AMQP 1.0 (Advanced Message Queueing Protocol), significantly increased persistent messaging performance, and made it easier for you to deploy the VMR in the public cloud.

AMQP 1.0

First and foremost, I’m excited to announce that the VMR fully supports AMQP 1.0, an open and standardized internet protocol for reliably passing messages between applications and organizations. AMQP 1.0 helps developers and architects build a diverse, coherent messaging ecosystem that connects systems in an interoperable, standardized way.

Our AMQP 1.0 offering includes full interoperability with other open protocols like MQTT and REST, and with all the Solace APIs too. That means, you can use MQTT and REST for your client applications (which might be IoT devices connected over the internet), and then use AMQP to connect those devices to your back-end applications (which might be running in the cloud, or in your own data center).… Read the rest

Solace Supports .NET Core 2.0

If you are a .NET programmer, chances are you were as happy as we were to read Microsoft’s blog announcing the availability of .NET Core 2.0 this August.

We’ve updated the Solace .NET API to be fully compatible with .NET Core 2.0. That means, no matter which OS(es) you are running on – Windows, Linux, OS X – version 10.1.0 of the Solace .NET API will make it easy for you to use Solace Messaging with your .NET Core 2.0 applications.

You can find the latest version of the Solace .NET API at http://dev.solace.com/downloads/ or get it directly from Nuget at https://www.nuget.org/packages/SolaceSystems.Solclient.Messaging/Read the rest

Improving IoT Security with Access Control List Substitution Variables

Many IoT applications will see very large numbers of clients connecting to Solace message routers via insecure public networks. For example, vehicles in a fleet may communicate with the company’s Solace routers over the Internet using MQTT. In such a scenario the company’s system administrators may want to implement Access Control Lists (ACLs) so each vehicle can only publish to topics containing their own MQTT client-username. This would prevent, for example, one vehicle from impersonating another.

But client connection counts can be quite large in IoT applications, making it impractical to create a unique ACL profile for each client. In the recent 8.3.0 release of the Solace Virtual Message Router, we added substitution variables for client-usernames in topic strings to ACL profiles, which means you can now apply a single ACL profile to many client connections. When the MQTT client-username substitution variable appears in an ACL rule being applied to a client, the router replaces that variable with the corresponding client-username for the client connection when performing an ACL check.… Read the rest

Explaining Solace’s Seriously Speedy Software

Ever since we introduced the VMR a little over 2 years ago, people have been asking me “I get why your hardware performs so much better than software messaging products, but why is the VMR so much faster than other software products on the market – isn’t it just software too?”

Well, yes, the VMR is software, but I wouldn’t say “just.” Our developers come from a background of building hard real-time software for things like IP routers, ATM switches, and other embedded solutions — designing for performance, robustness, and scalability is in our DNA. The engineers who programmed the network processor on the Network Acceleration Blade, and wrote the code that makes the Assured Delivery Blade do its magic, are the same people who wrote the code for the VMR. In fact, we share the code between the hardware and software wherever we can, building the two products from a common code base. … Read the rest

Messaging at the Speed of Business

The performance of Solace’s software and hardware data movement products has always been the best in the industry, but demand for ever higher throughput continues as the increasing ubiquity of technologies like big data, hybrid cloud, IoT and mobile computing drives the need to move more and more data in real-time. That’s why product performance is something our engineers are always working on, and it’s why we’ve just announced improvements to the performance of our Virtual Message Router software and 3560 appliance.

Version 8.2 of the VMR boosts message rates to 640,000 guaranteed messages per second in fan-out scenarios, and 80,000 guaranteed messages per second when routing messages on a 1:1 basis. That’s a 30%-50% improvement over earlier versions of the VMR.

Our hardware team has also been busy. We’ve just released the Assured Delivery Blade 4,  our fastest ADB ever. Combined with a new 80 Gbps network I/O blade in the latest 3560 chassis, this new configuration is 50-120% faster than the earlier ADB-3 systems.… Read the rest

New VMR 7.2.2 Adds Hyper-V Support and Eliding

Solace has just released VMR 7.2.2. We’ve had many people looking to use the VMR in Microsoft Hyper-V, so we’ve added Hyper-V to the list of virtualization environments that the VMR can be deployed in. You can download that package or any other at http://dev.solace.com/downloads.

This new version also brings the eliding feature to the VMR. Eliding means “to leave out or omit.” In context of messaging, eliding lets you set the maximum rate at which the router will deliver messages to applications. Publishers can send at whatever message rate they like. But consumers using eliding will have the message stream limited to the rate they desire, while still making sure that any message they receive will be the most recent message published on the topic . Eliding can be valuable when applications are connecting over expensive or low-bandwidth links, and do not need to see every message published on a topic, only the latest one.… Read the rest

Solace APIs Now Available via Maven Central

I’m happy to announce that as of today, the Solace JMS API and Solace Java API are available directly through Maven Central. So if you use a central repository for java build dependency management, you won’t need to manually retrieve the .jar files from our FTP site and add them to your project. You’ll find everything you need here.

If you aren’t using Maven Central and prefer to download the .jar files from our FTP site or developer portal as you have always done, don’t worry, that option still exists.

OSGi Bundles Too!

For Java programmers who are using the OSGi framework, we have news for you too. Our  JMS and Java .jar files are now OSGi bundles, containing all the necessary meta-data you need to use our APIs in those frameworks. This change in the .jar format is fully backwards compatible, so if you aren’t an OSGi user, the enhancement will be completely transparent to you.… Read the rest

New Version of VMR adds SEMPv2

A couple weeks ago, I wrote about the introduction of SEMPv2 on the Solace appliance – our new RESTful, object-oriented management protocol. In that blog, I promised that soon we would have SEMPv2 for the VMR. Well, that day has arrived!

Version 7.2.1 of the Virtual Message Router, which includes SEMPv2, is available for you to download now. It has the same rich feature set as the previous version of the VMR software, but now you can manage your message VPNs using SEMPv2. We’ve also increased the number of clients you can connect to a VMR in both the 90-day Evaluation Edition and full Enterprise Edition of the product.

If you missed our earlier blog posting describing SEMPv2, you can find it here.  Or if you are ready to just jump right in, check out the SEMP tutorials that will help you get started quickly. We’ve also got material to introduce you to both the SEMP Concepts and the entire API reference.… Read the rest

Introducing SolOS 7.2.2: New SEMP and So Much More

On Monday Solace released SolOS Version 7.2.2 for our hardware appliances. This release doubles the number of topics that can be stored by SolCache, doubles the number of access control list (ACL) rules that can be configured on the appliance, and enhances dead-message-queue (DMQ) functionality so that any queue on the router can now be designated as a DMQ.

But that great stuff isn’t even the biggest news about the release. What we’re really excited about is the introduction of version 2 of Solace Element Management Protocol, aka SEMPv2.  With SolOS Version 7.2.2 we’ve brought you the SEMP v2 objects you will need to perform the most common day-to-day message VPN configuration tasks on your routers. It’s our very first release, so we have a few more VPN level objects that we still need to implement, but those remaining objects will be coming soon. And we aren’t stopping there, subsequent SolOS releases will allow you to monitor the router using SEMPv2 and even complete the initial one-time commissioning operations that you go through when installing an appliance.… Read the rest

Solace Virtual Message Router (VMR) Release 7.2

Today we’re introducing Release 7.2 of the VMR. It’s a big step forward for the VMR in features, performance, and scaling.

One of our major goals for this new version of the VMR was to rev up performance. With R7.2, our benchmarks indicate that the VMR is two to five times faster than the other commonly used software message brokers. We’ve tested it under a wide range of conditions including diverse message sizes and distribution patterns. You can find all of our latest performance numbers here. We invite you to test it for yourself and let us know what you find. We think you’ll agree that the new VMR screams for all kinds of workloads.

We also know that for many of our customers, it is important that their applications work exactly the same whether they are connecting to a VMR or to a Solace messaging appliance. To that end, we’ve added a bunch of features to Release 7.2 VMR that were previously only available on the appliance, including support for:

  • Compressed client connections for use cases where bandwidth between client applications and the router is limited
  • TLS-encrypted bridge connections between VMRs for secure transfer of messages between routers
  • Client-certificates for securely authenticating client connections to the VMR
  • VMware Tools, to make it easier to manage the VMR in VMware environments

Under the hood, we’ve updated the underlying kernel, and improved the multi-threading of our software so that we can take better advantage of modern multi-core server platforms.… Read the rest