Posts

Crashing your Connected Car (Demo) Can Be a Good Thing

In recent years, Solace has established itself as a leading technology supplier to the connected vehicle market. Our customers include leading car makers, auto parts manufacturers, rail companies and air traffic agencies like the FAA.

While these all make great case studies, nothing beats a live demo. Especially if it ends in a car crash. Who can look away from a car crash?

With that in mind a colleague and I recently put together a demo that simulates simple, visceral examples of how our customers use Solace technology in connected vehicle use cases, including an actual (toy) car crash.

If you’re interested, watch this 90 second video, then read below for a blow-by-blow of what you’ve just seen, what’s going on behind the scenes, and how it applies to real world connected vehicle projects.

Seriously, go ahead. I’ll wait!

OK, let’s talk about what you just saw…

Architecture

First, I’ll summarize the major components of the demo:

  • Connected cars: The remote control car with the phone strapped to its roof represents a car with embedded sensors and 4G connectivity.
Read the rest

Step Aside Miss Daisy, It’s the Data that’s Driving Now

Cars aren’t the only things being “driven” in this new age of the connected car — a staggering array of sensors and control systems, roadside devices and third-party services are driving a deluge of real-time information to, from, between and within vehicles as they travel modern roadways.

In the Internet of Things, data creates the opportunity for value. And as complexity grows, so does the potential value of the data you collect. Combine IoT with the complexity of today’s vehicles and you have the potential for staggering value in terms of convenience, efficiency safety.

Consider some basic statistics. On average, a connected car will send 25 gigabytes of data to the cloud during an hour of operation. That’s about 6.9 terabytes a year. Just to be complete, Google’s self-driving car gathers about 750 megabytes of sensor data a second, which doesn’t include the car systems themselves. In any case, we’re talking about a lot of data moving around.… Read the rest